Thursday, April 28, 2016

Do You Know What I'll Do?

Do You Know What I'll Do? by Charlotte Zolotow, illustrated by Garth Williams.
Harper & Row, 1958.


Another library sale find, Do You Know What I'll Do? is a lovely book by Harper author-editor Charlotte Zolotow, featuring gorgeous illustrations by the great Garth Williams. A new edition was issued by HarperCollins in 2000, illustrated by Javaka Steptoe.  I'm a Steptoe fan, too, and I think both artists do Zolotow's gentle tale justice in completely different ways. You can check out the new version here, if you choose.

The story is simple. A little girl tells her baby brother all the things she will do for him. It is poetic and beautiful and I love it.















Our copy is another library discard. It looks a little worse for the wear, I'm more than pleased. (Twenty-five cents. Crazy, right?)





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Tuesday, April 26, 2016

The Children's Hour (1944)

The Children's Hour, illustrated by Waldo Peirce. The Hyperion Press, 1944.


 Here is another vintage book, picked from the recent Friends of the Wichita Public Library Book Sale. It has no jacket and it's bound in plain drab green, but don't judge it by its cover! This volume of poetry, as stated inside, features works by "Longfellow, Stevenson, Eugene Field, Mother Goose, Edward Lear, Lewis Carroll, Shakespeare, Christina Rossetti, Emerson, Tennyson and many others." It's a treasure trove of classic poetry, illustrated by painter Waldo Peirce.





Indeed, many of my personal favorites are here: "Wynken, Blynken and Nod," selections from Lewis Carroll's Alice books, Shakespeare's plays, and Stevenson's A Child's Garden of Verses, Edward Lear's nonsense rhymes and Christina Rossetti's sweet and simple verses. Mother Goose is well-represented, but so are Tennyson, Blake, and Longfellow. Enjoy!




"Father William" from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Edward Lear and Christina Rossetti





"A Boy's Song"

"Wynken, Blynken, and Nod" 

"Ariel's Song" from The Tempest






"The Lobster Quadrille" from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland




"The Owl and the Pussycat"

"The Tiger"

.

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Monday, April 25, 2016

Hilary Knight's The Owl and the Pussycat

Hilary Knight's The Owl and the Pussy-Cat, based on the poem by Edward Lear.
Macmillan Publishing Company, 1983.


Last week, the Friends of the Wichita Public Library held a book sale. Crossing my fingers, I headed to the main branch downtown on Friday, hoping to find a few treasures. I was quite pleased with my little haul! And here I am, sharing a book from the sale with you today. It is still April, which means it's still National Poetry Month, and it's about time I shared a poetry book again!


"The Owl and the Pussycat" by Edward Lear is one of our favorite poems. When Big Sis was very, very small, she made me read the Jan Brett version (board book) to her over and over again. I love collecting different artists' interpretations of the classic nonsense rhyme, and while I'm sorry to see this copy was discarded by a local elementary school, I promise to give this little stray a good home!


Hilary Knight, of course, is best known as the illustrator of Eloise, but he has illustrated a number of other books, too. This one was first published in 1983, and it has that warm 1980s feel to it. Does that make sense? As someone who spent most of her young childhood in that decade, the art is very familiar, even though it's technically new to me. It was last re-issued in 2001, by the way.


It does not open with the poem. Rather, a strange old man is receiving two guests, a little boy and girl, in his wondrous house. Look at the face in the fireplace!


He tells them a story, inspired in part by the marvelous things around them.


And so, the poem begins.














"They danced by the light of the moon."

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