The Biggest Smallest Christmas Present

The Biggest Smallest Christmas Present by Harriet Muncaster.
G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers, 2016.


I should have saved this one for Little Sis to review, as it is her favorite right now! She was already such a fan of Harriet Muncaster's Witch's Cat books, but this one really has her name written all over it!

It's about a little girl named Clementine. An extraordinary little girl...




... because Clementine is extraordinarily little!



She is so tiny that she bathes in a teacup and sleeps in a matchbox. Unfortunately, Santa Claus hasn't figured that out yet.


He brings her presents that would be perfect, if only they were scaled to her size! Her fairy dress-up set is lovely. One of the shoes replaces the matchbox as her bed!



Her mother suggests they write a message to Santa with icing on a gingerbread cookie. Santa doesn't get the message. He leaves a puppy!



She writes a message in the snow on her roof, but Santa misses that one, too.


(I joked with Little Sis that I could see her happily standing in the middle of a giant paintbox, too.)


At last, Clementine's parents have the perfect idea. They leave photos of Clementine enjoying her massive gifts through the years.


And this time, Santa leaves her another enormous present. Only this one turns out to be perfect for her. Can you guess what it might be?



Harriet Muncaster wrote on her blog that this was her first full-color 2D-illustrated picture book. While I adore her 3D stuff (those Witch's Cat books!), this book is just as whimsical and charming. We borrowed this one via interlibrary loan (thank you, Derby Public Library, just south of us!), but Little Sis has requested her own copy!

By the way, Harriet Muncaster's Instagram is one of my favorites!





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The Day Santa Stopped Believing in Harold

The Day Santa Stopped Believing in Harold by Maureen Fergus, illustrated by Cale Atkinson.
Tundra Books, 2016.

Happy St. Nicholas Day! I don't have an especially saintly book for you today. Instead, I have a Santa Claus title, and the Santa in this book isn't particularly saintly, either. It's a new favorite around our house, and you should definitely check it out!

You see, Santa is starting to doubt the existence of a boy named Harold. He wants to believe in Harold, but too many things just don't add up. He's sure, for instance, that Harold's mom writes his letters to Santa. And Harold looked so different when he visited last year. The elves and reindeer aren't helping with his disbelief. What a dilemma!



Meanwhile, Harold is having the exact same problem. He wants to believe in Santa, but he needs evidence!


So on Christmas Eve, but Harold and Santa plan to find out the truth once and for all!




This book is so cute and so funny. The illustrations pop! Mr. B and the girls had a blast reading it together. All three shoved it at me as soon as they finished. "You have to read this one NOW!" 💟





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The Christmas Cake in Search of Its Owner (Part Two)

The Christmas Cake in Search of Its Owner by Roger Duvoisin.
American Artists Group, 1941.

{This is the second half of the book. To view part one, click here.}

















So how about those sneaky grown-ups?! Everyone has a sweet tooth! And wasn't Aunt Annabelle so nice about the whole thing? Tee hee!


For more Roger Duvoisin, click here and here.


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The Christmas Cake in Search of Its Owner (Part One)

The Christmas Cake in Search of Its Owner by Roger Duvoisin.
American Artists Group, 1941.

I found this very small hardcover at an antique mall over the summer. Of course, I have a fondness for all things Roger Duvoisin, and it's a Christmas book to boot! It isn't in the best condition, and the pages are thin. The illustrations are black and white. Well, green and white, to be honest. It's a strange, charming little story, the kind you seldom find in modern picture books. American Artists Group, from what I can tell, is a greeting card company. I know Duvoisin was affiliated with them, and they published gift books. That's probably why I cannot seem to find any listings for editions other than this 1941 printing.

As it is very out of print, I wanted to share the whole thing with you. Because of its condition, I photographed the book. I wouldn't want to ruin the binding via the scanner.



















Stay tuned for Part 2!


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