Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!



Theodor Geisel, aka Dr. Seuss, was born on March 2, 1904, in Springfield, Massachusetts. In celebration of his birthday, the National Education Association, along with libraries, schools, and bookstores across the country, recognize the date as Read Across America.

Image via Seussville

During my bookstore days, we usually received an exciting goody box, full of activities and souvenirs for the store's Read Across America event. (In my little store, we held it during a regularly-scheduled Saturday storytime, close to the date.) I was always excited to see what theme Random House and company went for that year. There would be [Cat in the] Hat erasers, pencils, little reading logs for kids to record the books they read, printable activity sheets, recipes.

Do you have a favorite Dr. Seuss book? When I was little, my parents subscribed to the Early Moments Book Club, and I still own several of my book club editions of his books. I can quote most of Dr. Seuss's ABC  by heart. I cherish my daddy's copy of How the Grinch Stole Christmas, another favorite. The Lorax is special to me, because when I was in high school, I would read it over and over again to my little brother, who is 10 1/2 years my junior. I ran through all the Seuss books in the Chisholm Trail Elementary School library, loving the Horton the Elephant books and Thidwick the Big Hearted Moose the best. Big Sis went through a Wacky Wednesday phase. Little Sis went through her Green Eggs and Ham and Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You? phases.

As an adult, I still adore all of my childhood favorites, as well as those of my brother and daughters, but I have new favorites. I love his longer, stranger prose books, like The King's Stilts and the two Bartholomew Cubbins titles.

I thought I'd share some fun links with you today, as well as some rarer adaptations I found on YouTube. (I love me some YouTube.)

And now for the videos. I adore the animated classics they show on television (Chuck Jones rules!), and the Bob Clampett-directed Merrie Melodies Horton Hatches the Egg, but here are three rarer shorts, for your enjoyment.

The first two were directed by George Pal, featuring his Puppetoons. 




The last was made in the Ukraine in the 1980s by Kievnauchfilm. This particular version is dubbed in Russian, no subtitles, but if you know the story, you can follow it pretty easily. I love seeing the characters re-interpreted.



No matter what, I hope you share a book with a kiddo in your life today and every day!

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Comments

  1. When Julia was a toddler, she LOVED There's A Wocket in my Pocket - her absolute fav - I love Oh The Thinks You Can Think - " shlop shlop beautiful shlop, beautiful shlop with a cherry on top!" or some such thing.....:)

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    1. Yes! I read Oh The Thinks You Can Think many, many times to the oldest. :)

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  2. We love Dr Seuss! He's not very famous in Greece, the Cat in the Hat is the only book that's been translated (I doubt that any of his books can be translated and not lose the magic though) and besides it's out of print. But there's a bookstore that has copies of the original books, and we recently bought Dr Seuss'Pocket Box of Fun, with little pocket books that the kids can enjoy in English (the oldest one knows just a little bit, and the little one listens when we play and recognizes a few words). We also love Green Eggs and Ham -it's simple enough to be read in English and sooo funny! I love the Grinch too. We hope to read more in time.. Dr Seuss is amazing!

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    1. You know, I never thought of how difficult his books must be to translate, with all the nonsense words and the rhymes. That makes a lot of sense. Green Eggs and Ham is one of his simplest books. If I remember right, it came about as kind of a bet, whether he could write a book consisting of only so many words. (I just checked the book's Wikipedia page: 50 words!)

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