Adrienne Adams Easter Books


Good Friday will end in a little over an hour and a half, according to the clock here in Kansas.  We made hot cross buns and hollowed out some eggs, which we dyed and hung on a big branch.  Our Easter egg tree continues!  I will share pictures this weekend, but first, I have two more vintage books to share today, both illustrated by Adrienne Adams.

The Easter Bunny That Overslept by Priscilla and Otto Friedrich
illustrated by Adrienne Adams.  Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Company, Inc., 1957.
A revised edition with illustrations by Donald Saaf was published by HarperCollins in 2002.

Oh, this book is cute.  The whole premise is amusing:  the poor Easter Bunny oversleeps and doesn't wake up until May. He decides to deliver his eggs anyway, but no one wants the poor bunny's eggs.  It's Mother's Day!



He realizes the next holiday is the 4th of July, so he rushes home and repaints the eggs red, white, and blue. We next see him marching in an Independence Day parade.  Officials stop the parade. He is told his eggs are not wanted for the 4th of July.  He tries to give his eggs away as treats for Halloween, but he's informed that eggs are not treats.  Winter comes, and a fierce wind blows him to Santa's house at the North Pole.  Santa puts him to work, first helping him paint toys, then helping to deliver the toys on Christmas Eve.  Before he leaves the North Pole, Santa gives the Easter Bunny his Christmas present:  an alarm clock!


Sure enough, the Easter Bunny is right on time the following spring.  When he pays a visit to the first house, the baby at the beginning has grown into a toddler - a very sweet touch.


I love Adrienne Adams's art so much, so I was a bit miffed to see that the copy that is in print today has different artwork.  I think I want to check it out, though.  I love Donald Saaf's work with Dan Zanes...

And on to the next book, featuring Adams's little rabbit family, The Abbotts.

The Easter Egg Artists by Adrienne Adams.  Charles Scribner's Sons, 1976.
The Abbotts are amazing painters of Easter eggs, among other things.  A huge order has been placed, 100 dozen eggs to be delivered in January, to paint and sell by Easter.  Mr. and Mrs. Abbott's son, Orson, wants to be a painter and thinks he will help paint the eggs, too.

Before that time comes, however, there is a vacation to take!  First, they need to paint their car - or at least, the rusty spots.  Orson has a clever idea about that, and together, he and his father ready the car.  Their car and trailer catches the fancy of their fellow vacationers, who offer the Abbotts more painting jobs.


They paint the outside of a house, which catches the eye of a pilot.  Orson understood just how to paint the pilot's airplane.  When the family is asked to decorate the bridge over the river for the County Fair, Orson volunteers to do it.  He finishes just in time to help with the Easter eggs.


Orson loves decorating the Easter eggs.  He invents comic Easter eggs, and everyone wants to buy them!


Finally, all the orders are filled, and the only eggs left belong to the Abbotts themselves.  They hide them in the yard the night before Easter...


Father and Mother Abbott are too tired the next morning, but Orson climbs a tree to watch the youngsters hunt the eggs.  His parents look out the window just once.


Orson continues his painting.  Father and Mother Abbott seems pretty content to lie back and relax.

Relaxing sounds lovely, but we have a busy weekend planned!  Happy Easter Weekend, dear friends!


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Comments

  1. Look at the naughty look in his eyes as he hides eggs. HA! I love it.

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    Replies
    1. He does look pretty ornery, despite being such a nice, helpful bunny. ;)

      We read the Abbott Christmas book last year. In that one, Orson wants to throw a Christmas party for all the little rabbits in the neighborhood. He's such a sweet boy.

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